Music, Jump Cuts, And Unconventional Narratives In Godard

Posted by admin on Jul 7th, 2013

Music, Jump Cuts, And Unconventional Narratives In Godard

The Pioneering Work of Jean Luc Goddard
Goddard is considered one of the pioneers of French New Wave cinema. He is best regarded for his profoundly influential narrative film called Breathless. The film has become one of the most iconic films of the period. Goddard pioneered the use of jump cuts and spontaneous filming. Goddard and the French New Wave filmmakers were heavily influence by the American Beat Generation and Jazz Continue Reading »

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Isabelle Huppert In La Ceremonie: A Violent Misfit

Posted by admin on May 19th, 2013

French cinema is becoming very popular because of how nostalgic and amazing it can be. Whether you’re watching a classic film or you have began to watch an independent drama set in modern days, it is easy to see just why so many people love French cinema. One thing to remember about these types of movies is that you can easily find out more about the movies themselves and the actors that played in them on your own home computer.

In fact, Continue Reading »

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Immigration And Modern Struggles The Dardenne Brothers

Posted by admin on Apr 1st, 2013

A controversial group of Belgian filmmakers, they have created a variety of different films about those whom are living on the fringe of Belgian society. Many of those whom they feature are immigrants or young people living in shelters.

Recognition at Cannes film festival

Two of their films received the Palme d’Or award at the Cannes film festival – Rosetta in 1999 and L’Enfant in 2005. Rosetta features a girl trying to get away from her alcoholic mother. L’Enfant is about a young couple Continue Reading »

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Chocolat And White Material: The French Strggle With Race

Posted by admin on Jun 28th, 2012

There has always been a struggle with race in French cinema. The most beloved directors and actors from the world of French cinema are white. The material of the movies that are written is also white. This really makes it difficult for African Americans to appreciate the French cinema that makes its way into Hollywood.

It is something of a bizarre thing for actors of African American descent to be excluded from the world of French cinema. Everyone knows that are Continue Reading »

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The Films OF Charlotte Rampling: Now And Then

Posted by admin on Dec 16th, 2011

As a young woman, Charlotte Rampling blatantly stole every scene in which she appeared, she couldn’t help it. The lovely smooth skin, intensely knowing eyes and soft fluid voice all added to the intelligent, sensual personality that came across on the screen. Over the past few decades Ms. Rampling has continued to extol those virtues upon her admirers. Today as an experienced actress Ms. Rampling continues to captivate audiences around the world.

Films in which small roles are turned into unforgettable moments such as “The Verdict” Continue Reading »

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Pop Art And Extreme Politics In The Films Of Godard

Posted by admin on Dec 12th, 2011

Godard and Truffaut are considered the pillars and architects of the French New Wave movement in cinema, which began in the 1960s. Godard, however, is more stylistically adventurous and avant-garde than Truffaut, and the films that he shot in the 1960s are some of the greatest examples of pop art and extreme politics ever put to celluloid.

In his early years, some of Godard’s greatest influences were American gangster films and pop art. The plot of movies like Breathless and Band of Outsiders are the straight out of the American gangster genre. Even if you
are unfamiliar with Continue Reading »

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Classic And Modern French Cinema: A History

Posted by admin on Dec 9th, 2011

Classic And Modern French Cinema: A History

The classic French film industry in the 19th and early 20th centuries was arguably the world’s most important, certainly among the most influential. Despite suffering a lack of capital after World War I, French film continued to remain prolific and became known for such styles as poetic realism and French Impressionist Cinema. Some of the greatest films to come from this era include Marcel Pagnol’s famous trilogy Marius, Fanny and Cesar, Under the Roofs of Paris by Rene Clair, Carnival in Flanders by Jacques Feyder, Jean Continue Reading »

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Our Three Favorite French Actors RIGHT NOW

Posted by admin on Oct 11th, 2011

French actors and actresses are some of the best in the business and whether you’ve got www.directtelevisionpackages.com internet or a Blockbuster card they’re not hard to spot. Here are a few of our favorite Frenchies to keep an eye out for…
Gerard Depardeu: He recently made headlines for an unfortunate incident on a plane but he’s had a long and illustrious career both in film and stage. He’s about as French as they come and he’s still sexy even up in his 70s.
Marion Cottilard: She’s Continue Reading »

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Multiculturalism In The Films Of Agnes Varda

Posted by admin on Jul 23rd, 2011

The innovative films of Agnes Varda are as stunning in concept as they are in actualization. Pre-dating the French New Wave movement and joining comrades in the Rive Gauche cinema movement, she experiments with art and cinema while addressing issues of feminism, social conflicts, and multiculturalism.

Having been born as a mix between her French mother and Greek father, Agnes grew to become a world-renowned artist of truth. Having recently turned 81, her documentary style focuses on realism and gritty issues while still managing to confound Continue Reading »

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The Immortal Acting And Smoking Of Jean Paul Belmondo

Posted by admin on Jul 20th, 2011

Suave sophistication and boyish charm seep gently from every movement as Jean Paul Belmondo caresses first his top and then his bottom lip. A move he repeats periodically through out his time on the screen in his first major role, “A bout de Souffle” (1960). The audience knows he’s no good, the girl is pretty sure he’s no good, but neither cares. As they debate the way to light a cigarette the playful tension mounts and his bad ways are almost revealed.

Likeable cad escapism characters repeat in several of Belmondo’s Continue Reading »

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